Tweet, tweet.

Regardless of the extensive work that goes into a PR campaign behind the scenes, we as the audience identify its birth when it hits the media. Social media is the most commonly used vehicle to drive such campaigns. The rapid ascent of social media usage has enabled an inclination towards the use of twitter and facilitates widespread exposure. One such user is AMPR. As one of Australia’s leading public relation firms, AMPR are a band of “savvy” PR consultants operating in a mix of varying platforms (AMPR, 2016). This includes delivering excellence in social media marketing and strategy for a variety of industries from fashion to lifestyle.

Effective twitter usage employs the language tools to meet its intended target publics. Think Public Relations (2014) details that an audience is a mass of people while a public is someone with specific interest in something. This can be facilitated via the use of hashtagging and mentions. Hash tags are used as ‘branding vehicles’ Allcock, 2013) and used to create a ‘trend’ whereby the audience uses it as a means to access more content. The purpose is for increased communication and accessibility. The ‘@’ is used as a ‘mention’, creating a connection between the agency, the company and the audience (Bruns & Stieglitz, 2014).

AMPR’s twitter boasts effective PR in the twitter milieu. As social media strategists, they have harnessed the twitter language of using ‘#’ and ‘@. Effective Twitter language can be seen in AMPR’s posts for Zara, as event based PR, and Mazda as promotional based to the twitter community. The two examples utilise word play and use of adjectives (‘excited, newly and revealed), they are promoting exclusivity and have harnessed the branding vehicle in driving their event/promotion. The use of tags and mentions further act to create traffic.

AMPR MAZDA
AMPR Tweet for Mazda Australia. Source: https://twitter.com/AMPR_Group

 

AMPR ZARA
AMPR Tweet for Zara. Source:https://twitter.com/AMPR_Group

References

Bruns, A, & Stieglitz, S 2013, ‘Towards more systematic Twitter analysis: metrics for tweeting activities’, International Journal of Social Research Methodology, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 91-108. Available from: 10.1080/13645579.2012.756095. [10 May 2016]

Allcock, S 2013, ‘HOW TO… #HASHTAG YOUR TWEETS’, Caterer & Hotelkeeper, vol. 203, no. 4775, p. 38.

AMPR Public Relations (2016) What we do. Available at: http://www.ampr.com.au/what-we-do (Accessed: 1 April 2016).

Kassens, AL 2014, ‘Tweeting Your Way to Improved #Writing, #Reflection, and #Community’, Journal of Economic Education, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 101-109. Available from: 10.1080/00220485.2014.889937. [1 April 2016].

Wilcox, Cameron, Reber and Shin (2014) Think Public Relations, Pearson Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, United States of America. Chapter 8, pp. 172

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